main content area SiteMap
:::
Font Size:SML
四位黑蝙蝠中隊早期隊員合影
早期卅四中隊空勤隊員合照
民國四十七年聖誕晚會隊員與美軍人員合影
中隊會餐合影
P4Y空投前之任務提示
P4Y準備起飛
C-123機執行日間運補任務
 
 

Brief Introduction

In 1952, Western Enterprise Inc., a covert station of U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), located in Taiwan, collaborated with the ROCAF to set up a “special operations squadron (China Taskforce)” in Taoyuan AFB in order to conduct airdropping and psychological operations in Mainland China. The squadron was relocated to Hsinchu AFB in 1953, and kicked off electronic intelligence (ELINT) missions over the Mainland from May 1956. Starting from January 1958, the squadron was officially named as “the 34th Squadron,” and had adopted a “marking of flying black bat” in the year. Consequently the 34th Squadron became known as the “Black Bat Squadron.”

Spanning from 1952 to 1972 during the time of its special ops, the Black Bat Squadron (including its former body) had lost 15 aircraft and 148 lives, and is deemed as a special ops unit in the ROCAF that suffered the highest operational attrition rate.

Mission of Significance

越南直昇機任務執行前,小組人員接受UH-1H直昇機訓練
Fox Hunt Project

In January 1955, the ROC government was planning to implement airdropping missions for psychological warfare and ELINT missions, ROCAF GHQs mapped out the “Fox Hunt Project” accordingly to incorporate all relevant training and operational activities. For the sake of the Project, A P4Y Privateer[sic] was chosen from the 8th Group of the 2nd Wing, together with 13 crew selected from the 33rd, the 34th, and the 35th SQ from the Group, including Pilot Lu De-chi, and Electronic Warfare Officers (EWO) Lo Pu and Li Chong-shan.

P4Y Privateer[sic] is a four-engine heavy patrol bomber, capable of long-range reconnaissance and patrol. It is equipped with a AN/APS-15 airborne search radar and a blind bombing radar, able to perform surface scans over 100 miles in range for vessels and maritime features, and drop bombs disregard of weather conditions. It also accommodates a complete ELINT suite, including various receivers, pulse analyzers, signal direction finders, semi-automatic signal indicators, automatic low-frequency indicators, and tuners for all frequencies. Under the Project, a total of 14 missions were conducted from April 1955 to April 1956.

The 3831st Unit

In August 1958, the 8th Group was disbanded, and its 33rd SQ with its personnel and equipment were used to staff and equip the “3831st Unit,” which was commissioned on 1st March 1959 to be responsible for airdropping deep inside Mainland China as well as shipping ammunitions, military supplies, and personnel into the Da Shin military base in the triangle area of Thailand, Myanmar, and Laos.

The 3831st Unit had operated P4Y and C-47 aircraft to conduct missions from 1959 to 15th April 1961. During a mission to the borders between Thailand and Myanmar, a P4Y was attacked and shot down by 6 bandits from Myanmar Air Force, and crew onboard were killed except for Captain Liu Chao-chen and Captain Wang Xiang-yun bailing out. On 15th April 1961, because of the ill-fated P4Y, the presence of our anti-Communist troops stationed in Da Shin military base had triggered an international uproar, and the ROCAF couldn’t help but had to initiate a series of transport maneuvers, code-named “Guolei Exercise,” to evacuate all troops stationed there.

Nanxing Project

To jointly fight against Communists in Mainland China and Viet Cong in Vietnam, the U.S. and the ROC had signed several special operations agreements in which U.S. side provides aircraft and equipment while ROC side assigns pilots, navigators, radio officers, and EWOs to physically implement the special ops. The mission results would be shared between both sides.

In March 1963, to support U.S. special ops troops in Vietnam, both sides signed the agreement on the “Nanxing Project” to assist South Vietnamese in transporting and airdropping missions to the frontlines, and train their paratroopers to fight against Viet Cong. From 1963 to 1969, 252 transport sorties were conducted and 3 among them were injured by Viet Cong flaks. Luckily, they survived and lost no one because the damages weren’t serious enough, and the crew onboard dealt with them quite skillfully.

Jilong Project

As requested by the U.S., ROC government instructed the ROCAF, under the code name of “Jilong Project,” to assign crew to operate a C-130E with latest electronic equipment at the time, taking off at nightfall from USAF Takhli AFB or Chiang Mai AFB, and flying at low altitude to airdrop specialized electronic sensors at designated locations in Ussuriysk, so as to monitor the test launch statuses of various types of PLA missiles.

The ROCAF then selected qualified aircrew to receive conversion training in the U.S. from 27th September 1968 to 30th April 1969. At 1711 hours on 17th May 1959, a C-130E controlled by Pilot Sun Pei-cheng, together with Pilot Huang Wen-lu, Pilot Yang Li-shu, Navigator He Zuo-ming, Navigator Liao Huang-ying, Navigator Feng Hai-tao, Radio Officer Shi Tong-chin, EWO Chen Qi-shan, EWO Liu En-gu, Flight Engineer Yi You-neng, Loadmaster Liu Gui-sheng, and Loadmaster Gui Hsin-de onboard, took off from Takhli AFB in Thailand, and maintained an altitude at 16,000 ft high. While entering the airspace of Mainland China through the its borderlines with Thailand and Myanmar, the C-130E flew at its lowest possible to reach the target area of Mazong Mountain. Then, it followed the same route to fly back, and arrived at Chiang Mai AFB at 0610 hours on the next day to complete the mission successfully.

Jinbian Project

“Jingbian Project,” or known as a mission to Laos, was proposed by U.S. CIA in the beginning of 1971. Under the Project, the ROCAF assigned 12 pilots, 7 from the Air Rescue Squadron in Chiayi AFB and 5 from Air Transport Group in Pingtung AFB, to receive a fast-paced 30-day conversion training of UH-1H Iroquois in Chiayi AFB. The training was assisted by Air America. After the training, all crew reported to the 34th Squadron “Black Bats” in Hsinchu AFB, and received follow-on training provided by pilots from Air America.

The mission of the crew was to deploy high-tech acoustic sensors (or called “spiders”) at concentrated and populated areas of Viet Cong (on the north of 17° North latitude), to monitor their ground activities, force movements, and even human voices. They operated a Hughes 500P or Hughes 600, a 5-blade Hughes 500 with a modified engine so as to lower its noise, and took off from PS44, an undisclosed location of U.S. military, during dark hours. Then, they flew at low altitude to penetrate inside the mountainous areas close to Hanoi and Dien Bien Phu in North Vietnam, and collected intelligence of Viet Cong at designated locations.

Aircraft Used by the 34th Squadron

  • B-17: A preflight briefing in front of a B-17, dated in 1960 (source: Mr. Zou Li-xu)B-17: A preflight briefing in front of a B-17, dated in 1960 (source: Mr. Zou Li-xu)
  • P4Y: a lineup of P4Ys in Hsinchu AFB (source: ROCAF Academy Museum)P4Y: a lineup of P4Ys in Hsinchu AFB (source: ROCAF Academy Museum)
  • P2V: A preflight briefing in front of a P2V, dated in 1961, on an improved tarmac (source: ROCAF GHQs)P2V: A preflight briefing in front of a P2V, dated in 1961, on an improved tarmac (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • P2V: A P2V parked on the pavement (source: Mr. Huang Zhi-mo)P2V: A P2V parked on the pavement (source: Mr. Huang Zhi-mo)
  • B-24: A profile shot of B-24, which bears a marking of the 8th Group (source: ROCAF GHQs)B-24: A profile shot of B-24, which bears a marking of the 8th Group (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • B-25: An unarmed B-25 of the 8th Group, especially the guns on its nose were removed (source: ROCAF GHQs)B-25: An unarmed B-25 of the 8th Group, especially the guns on its nose were removed (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • B-26: A group photo of B-26 crew (source: ROCAF Academy) B-26: A group photo of B-26 crew (source: ROCAF Academy)
  • C-46: A C-46 used by the 8th Group (source: ROCAF GHQs)C-46: A C-46 used by the 8th Group (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • C-123: A C-123 used during the period of “Nanxing Project,” with a 34th SQ marking on its vertical fin, which may have well indicated that the cargo plane was not used for operations (source: ROCAF GHQs)C-123: A C-123 used during the period of “Nanxing Project,” with a 34th SQ marking on its vertical fin, which may have well indicated that the cargo plane was not used for operations (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • C-123: A C-123 flying over the jungle in Vietnam (source: Mr. Huang Zhi-mo)C-123: A C-123 flying over the jungle in Vietnam (source: Mr. Huang Zhi-mo)
  • P3A: An acceptance ceremony for P3A, dated in 1966 (source: ROCAF GHQs) P3A: An acceptance ceremony for P3A, dated in 1966 (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • P3A model: A model to commemorate the occasion for the ROCAF to receive P3As while Mr. Huang Wen-lu is the first from right (source: Mr. Huang Wen-lu)P3A model: A model to commemorate the occasion for the ROCAF to receive P3As while Mr. Huang Wen-lu is the first from right (source: Mr. Huang Wen-lu)
  • S-58T: A S-58T helicopter used in training missions (source: Mr. Huang Wen-lu)S-58T: A S-58T helicopter used in training missions (source: Mr. Huang Wen-lu)
  • S-2A: A S-2A Tracker Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) aircraft (source: ROCAF GHQs)S-2A: A S-2A Tracker Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) aircraft (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • S-2E: the aircraft (later modified as S-2T Turbo Tracker, as shown above) was used while the 34th SQ was reorganized as an ASW Group in 1978. (source: ROCAF GHQs)S-2E: the aircraft (later modified as S-2T Turbo Tracker, as shown above) was used while the 34th SQ was reorganized as an ASW Group in 1978. (source: ROCAF GHQs)
  • DHC-6: the aircraft was used by the 34th SQ for conducting missions of “Jinbian Project.” (source: ROCAF GHQs)DHC-6: the aircraft was used by the 34th SQ for conducting missions of “Jinbian Project.” (source: ROCAF GHQs)

Photos of Events

  • Photo of the 68th anniversary of the Black Bat SquadronPhoto of the 68th anniversary of the Black Bat Squadron
  • Photo of remarks from the presiding officerPhoto of remarks from the presiding officer
  • Photo of presenting mementosPhoto of presenting mementos
  • Photo with prestigious guestsPhoto with prestigious guests
  • Group photo with all guestsGroup photo with all guests
  • Personal regards to former Black BatsPersonal regards to former Black Bats
  • Photo of the 67th anniversary of the Black Bat Squadron and an exhibition of Colonel Ye Zheng-mingPhoto of the 67th anniversary of the Black Bat Squadron and an exhibition of Colonel Ye Zheng-ming
  • Waiting for the arrival of presiding officerWaiting for the arrival of presiding officer
  • Photo with prestigious guests.Photo with prestigious guests.
  • Group photo with all guests.Group photo with all guests.
  • Remarks by presiding officerRemarks by presiding officer
  • Media interviewsMedia interviews
  • Photo of the 66th anniversary of the Black Bat SquadronPhoto of the 66th anniversary of the Black Bat Squadron
  • Opening ceremony for Dongda ParkOpening ceremony for Dongda Park

Chiang Ching-kuo and the 34th Squadron

Aside from giving policy guidance, Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo was very attentive to the daily needs of the 34th squadron personnel, and took part in their functions and gatherings quite frequently. The following are some noteworthy photos that are rarely seen, and many of them are revealed to the public for the first time.

  • Photo, dated circa 1958 or 1959, of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (right) and Mr. Ray S. Cline (left), Chief of the CIA station in Taiwan (source: ROCAF Academy)Photo, dated circa 1958 or 1959, of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (right) and Mr. Ray S. Cline (left), Chief of the CIA station in Taiwan (source: ROCAF Academy)
  • Photo of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (right) joined a moonlight barbecue party hosted by the 34th Squadron (source: ROCAF Academy)Photo of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (right) joined a moonlight barbecue party hosted by the 34th Squadron (source: ROCAF Academy)
  • Photo of a moonlight party hosted by the 34th Squadron on the tarmac in front of the Squadron Building in Hsinchu AFB (source: ROCAF Academy)Photo of a moonlight party hosted by the 34th Squadron on the tarmac in front of the Squadron Building in Hsinchu AFB (source: ROCAF Academy)
  • Photo of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (middle) and a spouse of U.S. personnel in a recreational session during the party while Mr. Ray Cline of the CIA was sitting as the first from left on the front row behind Mr. Chiang, and Mrs. Chiang, the third from left (source: ROCAF Academy) Photo of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (middle) and a spouse of U.S. personnel in a recreational session during the party while Mr. Ray Cline of the CIA was sitting as the first from left on the front row behind Mr. Chiang, and Mrs. Chiang, the third from left (source: ROCAF Academy)
  • Photo of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (left), Mr. Ray Cline (right), and the singer for the party (source: ROCAF Academy)Photo of Mr. Chiang Ching-kuo (left), Mr. Ray Cline (right), and the singer for the party (source: ROCAF Academy)
  • Photo of Mrs. Chiang (the third from right) joined a function with spouses of the 34th Squadron (source: ROCAF Academy)Photo of Mrs. Chiang (the third from right) joined a function with spouses of the 34th Squadron (source: ROCAF Academy)

Update date:2022-03-23